ARTICLE: “How cryptocurrencies opened the doors for my escape from Venezuela”

Original Art by Emiliano Siem AKA Sooperchicken

LOL, I can’t believe it took me so long to publish this here, it happened more than a month ago. Arguably my biggest accomplishment since I started writing in English, I got published in Hacker Noon. This site is a daily check for me and there I am, among their pages, among their contributors.

I want to keep writing for them, keep the momentum going, but my aim is to write about cryptocurrencies from a user perspective and I already spent all of my Bitcoin. And that’s where the story starts:

I sold all my bitcoins before the latest stage of the crypto winter.

I’m not proud of it and I’m not a seer, I was just broke and hungry. That money was my safety net and now I’m free falling into the abyss, but that’s neither here nor there. The point is I’m not a Bitcoin owner anymore. And cryptocurrencies seem to be falling into the abyss… 

Then I go into my usual conspiracy-minded-type-of-argument:

I don’t claim to know exactly what’s happening, I’m as confused as the authors of the articles about the crash I’ve been reading. What I do know is that Bitcoin’s economy is not strong enough yet and it’s still vulnerable to attacks and manipulation. 

(…)

Intrigue, prestidigitation, dirty tricks. An attack, that is how I see this crash and that is how I see the boom and super high climb of 2017. That shit wasn’t natural and this isn’t either. Dark forces are playing with our heads and with our money supply, testing our behavior, watching us run for our lives. And taking notes.

And then and only then I start telling my story. Which is a good one, and complements my more dramatic guest-post on Metapsychosis from a few months ago.

So don’t waste more time, go and read it –> “How cryptocurrencies opened the doors for my escape from Venezuela” — According to Medium it’ll take only five minutes and at the moment of publication has 182 claps that support the message.

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Venezuelan Art Report 003: La Muy Bestia Pop, Los Amigos Invisibles, La Corte, La Leche y Dermis Tatú

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November, 2018 – We’re staying on the music business. There’s no other way around this, it’s the main area I can deliver the goods with confidence and knowledge. I have a plan already in motion to expand this report into all the arts, but until it gains momentum you all are stuck with music and more music.

On this edition we’re entering the wayback machine and exploring classic albums that might not be so classic to the international audience these Art Reports are cultivating. Amazingly we’re staying in Venezuela, when these albums came out the population of the country wasn’t spread all over the world.  Sadly, we’re staying in Caracas. Because I’m biased. And at that point in time not that many albums from outside the capital saw the light of day.

So, let’s do this: Continue reading

ARTICLE: “Tales of a Venezuelan Expat: Dispatch #1 (Don’t cry for me, Argentina)”

So, I let it all out and got my first feature in an online publication I respect and admire. I don’t know if you’re aware of Metapsychosis, but they publish articles of the highest caliber and everyone involved seems to be some kind of genius, present company excluded. Anyway, my piece is a first-person shooter about my recent experiences as an immigrant and it starts like this:

I haven’t admitted to myself that I left my country for good. If you ask me, I’m on vacations, looking for business opportunities and establishing contact with likeminded people. Everyone I’ve met told me not to go back, to at least get some kind of legal documentation from another country, to spread my wings. They all want to talk about the crisis, most of them ask me for possible solutions I don’t have and look at me with understated pity. And I understand.

Later on it gets political even though it pretends not to:

I don’t feel comfortable discussing politics or economics, but I’ll say that every article I read about Venezuela’s situation, from both sides of the conflict, feels shallow and agenda driven. I wouldn’t even consider the opinion of an outsider that gets its information from the media, I’m talking about high level journalists that live inside the country. All of their analysis seems to be evading basic truths, facts, causes. They seem to ignore the macro, the big picture, and what a small but crucial dot in the grand chessboard Venezuela is.

And almost at the end it gets all cinéma vérité:

The last time I set foot in Caracas it offered me a sad and creepy spectacle. It was a Saturday and a shopping mall I used to walk by frequently when I lived there was almost deserted, most of the shops were closed and only a few lost souls were there. The streets weren’t empty, but they weren’t exactly beaming with life, and the traffic was so light you might as well have been in a frontier town. And the faces, oh, the broken faces…

But please do read the whole thing, it’s not that long and it hits you hard.

Venezuelan Art Report 001: Blanca Haddad, Dj Trujillo, Lienzos, Adriana Berroterán and Pobeda.

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June, 2018. – We travel around the world for the inaugural Venezuelan Art Report.

Let’s make this space useful. I have access to a wealth of information almost nobody is privy to, all of the artists the Venezuelan Art Report will feature need exposure and an international audience and this blog needs some kind of focus. Everybody wins, especially you, the art connoisseur hungry for the new new new wave, for the skewed vision that coming from a destroyed country provides.

This is going to be incredible for all parts involved, I can feel it. And it starts now Continue reading

Honesty is…

This blog exists because I need work.
Paying jobs as a writer.
You should hire me and compensate me in Dollars or Bitcoin.

A little about me: I spent the last seven years of my life sculpting my first novel, “La Tormenta”, while my country, Venezuela, fell to pieces around me. The writing process was challenging enough, the hardest endeavour I’ve endured by far, and I also had to deal with devaluation over devaluation, working for a shrinking salary, shortages of everything that’s sacred, all kind of strikes and protests and roadblocks set on fire. Also, people just yapping on and on about all that and the latest sporting event, instead of listening to me whine about my work.

I also had very noisy neighbors.

So, not to brag, but I’m basically indestructible and kind of a Superhero.
In related news, in the downtime I also became a sorcerer.

And now, you can have me as part of your team. Hire me.

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Cover art by: Adolfo Malavé, designer extraordinaire.