WORK: “What happens when all the 21 million Bitcoins are mined?”

Photo by Aleksi Räisä on Unsplash

Boom! Another smoking hot crypto article published, to end the year with a bang. I want this topic to be my niche and the magic is taking hold. I just need to publish a hundred more throughout 2020 and my reputation will be solidified. So, you know, hire me.

This time I tackled a familiar subject that all of the experts have analyzed, and summarized and explained in the simplest way. It’s supported by the most credible sources and it lights up all the green lights in the Yoast SEO plugin. So, you know, victory!  

But anyway, what will happen when all Bitcoins are mined? Find out in the real article, or get a taste after the jump:

More, much more

ARTICLE: “Tales of a Venezuelan Expat: Dispatch #1 (Don’t cry for me, Argentina)”

So, I let it all out and got my first feature in an online publication I respect and admire. I don’t know if you’re aware of Metapsychosis, but they publish articles of the highest caliber and everyone involved seems to be some kind of genius, present company excluded. Anyway, my piece is a first-person shooter about my recent experiences as an immigrant and it starts like this:

I haven’t admitted to myself that I left my country for good. If you ask me, I’m on vacations, looking for business opportunities and establishing contact with likeminded people. Everyone I’ve met told me not to go back, to at least get some kind of legal documentation from another country, to spread my wings. They all want to talk about the crisis, most of them ask me for possible solutions I don’t have and look at me with understated pity. And I understand.

Later on it gets political even though it pretends not to:

I don’t feel comfortable discussing politics or economics, but I’ll say that every article I read about Venezuela’s situation, from both sides of the conflict, feels shallow and agenda driven. I wouldn’t even consider the opinion of an outsider that gets its information from the media, I’m talking about high level journalists that live inside the country. All of their analysis seems to be evading basic truths, facts, causes. They seem to ignore the macro, the big picture, and what a small but crucial dot in the grand chessboard Venezuela is.

And almost at the end it gets all cinéma vérité:

The last time I set foot in Caracas it offered me a sad and creepy spectacle. It was a Saturday and a shopping mall I used to walk by frequently when I lived there was almost deserted, most of the shops were closed and only a few lost souls were there. The streets weren’t empty, but they weren’t exactly beaming with life, and the traffic was so light you might as well have been in a frontier town. And the faces, oh, the broken faces…

But please do read the whole thing, it’s not that long and it hits you hard.