LISTEN: Foster & The Pranksters – “La Honda” and “THE ACID TEST” EPs

I first heard about Foster through “Plant the Rapper”, his now-deleted Chance the Rapper diss. I’d just released my reasonings about the superstar’s suspicious rise to fame and his lyrics had ten times more information than my video. Also, they had slick lines and were funny.

His band’s name is a reference to Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters, characters that are bound to appear frequently on this blog, and they’ve just released two back to back EPs that will not get the attention they deserve because they reveal too much. Foster might be a firecracker on Twitter, but he knows what’s up. They combine rock and hip hop in a brand new way; Danny Brown once rightly said that this particular mix of genres died because of Fred Durst, but Foster & the Pranksters don’t sound anything like the ill fated rap metal.

It’s to be noted that “La Honda” features Royce Da 5’9″ on the final track, one of the coldest MCs out there when he’s not defending Eminem.

The formal info about the release says: 
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Second video: “Is Chance the Rapper an industry plant? Reasoning inside”

Another video about hip hop to show my understanding on the subject to a non existent audience. The fear present in the first video persists. Still, I think I make a strong case and make my points clear. And I believe the content will attract some kind of following eventually, but I thought the same thing about my Twitter account in English and look how that turned out. On the other hand, You Tube is not a dying social network… but I digress. The thing is, Chance the Rapper is an industry plant.

The formal info that accompanies the video:  Continue reading

Two or three paragraphs about Chance the Rapper’s “Coloring Book”

The third mixtape by the half emcee/ half singer from Chicago is half gospel hip hop/ half club music. On my first spin I thought at last, through Chance, I was going to be able to appreciate this new wave of mumble rap the children seem to be crazy about. It features Future, Young Thug and that idiotic kid Lil Yachty and none of those songs make me want to rip my ears off. I even liked “Smoke Break“at first.  On repeated listens though, I tend to skip them and the Justin Beaver one. That sound just doesn’t appeal to me even with Chance and his production team in the mix.

As for the gospel, I propose it’s the reason this album didn’t really blew up worldwide. It was critically lauded across the board, the Grammy academy changed its rules just to be able nominate it, Chano appeared in every screen and became a household name, but the music per se got to a point and then stalled. You can talk about God all you want, just ask Kendrick, but.unlike jazz and funk, gospel is completely specific. It has all those catholic connotations and people from other walks of life don’t want to hear that shit. Also, personally, gospel doesn’t speak to me. I have no memories associated to it like most gringos. Anyway, “Coloring Book” didn’t really explode like it was supposed to.

As for Chance, his singing sounds better than ever in this mixtape, the very musical pieces bring out the best in his voice. His rapping though, It’s not on “Acid Rap” level. He’s got some slick lines here and there, but the melodies and not the lyrics were his main focus and the hip hop part suffered. The exception is “How Great”. On that note, let’s talk about Jay Electronica’s verse: Incredible. It’s not even that good by his standards and it’s still one of the bests of 2016.

In conclusion: Overall it’s a good project, parts of it are great, but Chance, do yourself a favor and drop acid before starting on your next one.

BONUS, the clips:

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